Blueberry and Honey Muffins–A Delicious Way To Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Blueberry and Honey Muffins–A Delicious Way To Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Blueberries are one of our favorite fruits. We love them fresh off the bush, but also in muffins. Enjoy my family recipe as you read some of the benefits of the berry. Thanks to the website, benefitsofblueberry.com

Ingredients
Topping Ingredients For Crumble:

1/4 cup – light brown sugar
Five tablespoons – unsalted butter, cold
Four tablespoons – honey
1/4 teaspoon – vanilla extract
1/2 cup – all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon – kosher salt

For Muffins:
2 cups – all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons – baking powder
½ teaspoon – kosher salt
1 cup – sugar
½ cup – unsalted butter, softened
3 Tablespoons – honey
1 teaspoon – vanilla extract
2 – large eggs
½ cup – milk
2 cups – fresh blueberries

 

For Muffins:
2 cups – all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons – baking powder
½ teaspoon – kosher salt
1 cup – sugar
½ cup – unsalted butter, softened
3 Tablespoons – honey
1 teaspoon – vanilla extract
2 – large eggs
½ cup – milk
2 cups – fresh blueberries

 

Directions

Cut the butter into cubes and place in a mixing bowl with the flour. Rub the butter into the flour until it resembles breadcrumbs, then stir in the sugar, salt, and honey.

Refrigerate in an airtight container for at least 30 minutes.

For the muffins: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter 12 muffin cups and dust with flour. In a small bowl combine the flour, baking powder, and salt.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together sugar, butter, honey, and vanilla. Add eggs one at a time and mix well; stir in milk. Add the dry ingredients and mix just until combined. Remove the bowl from the mixer and gently fold in blueberries using a rubber spatula. Scoop the mixture into the prepared muffin cups, filling them about three-fourths full. Sprinkle each top with 1 tablespoon of the salted honey crumble. Bake on the center rack of oven until golden, about 30 to 35 minutes.

Repeatedly ranked in the U.S. diet as having one of the highest antioxidant capacities among all fruits, vegetables, spices, and seasonings is none other than Blueberries. Blueberries are an excellent source of vitamins C and K, manganese and a good source of dietary fiber. Blueberries are among the fruits highest in antioxidant power, mainly due to their many phytochemicals:

  • Anthocyanins, catechins, quercetin, kaempferol and other flavonoids
  • Ellagitannins and ellagic acid
  • Pterostilbene and resveratrol

Good For Heart

A study in 2012 of 93,000 women found that participants who ate three or more portions of blueberries and strawberries a week had a 32% lower risk of a heart attack compared with those who ate berries once a month or less. According to a new significant study led by Dr. Eric Rimm, associate professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, Diet that includes a higher intake of blueberries and strawberries, the better. Women who ate the fewest blueberries and strawberries were at increased risk of heart attack. Those who ate the most were 34% less likely to have suffered a heart attack than were women who ate the least of these fruits. Daily blueberry consumption may reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness, which may be due, in part, to increased nitric oxide production.

Delays Aging

Blueberries, along with other colorful fruits and vegetables, contain high levels of antioxidants. These compounds help to mop up damaging oxygen free radicals in the blood, which can damage cell membranes and DNA through a process known as oxidative stress. Free radicals cause many of the physical signs of aging.

Boost Concentration And Memory

Anthocyanin, which gives the blueberries their intense purple color, appears to protect the neurons in the brain. In one study, 47 adults aged 68 years and older with MCI were randomly allocated to consume a freeze-dried blueberry powder equivalent to a cup of blueberries or a placebo powder once a day for 16 weeks. The researchers carried out pre- and postintervention cognitive tests on all participants and brain imaging in a subset. “There was an improvement in cognitive performance and brain function in those who had the blueberry powder compared with those who took the placebo,” Dr. Krikorian the lead researcher, Ph.D. from University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center, in Ohio. reported. The cognitive tests included a verbal list–learning task, a simple paper-and-pencil line drawing motor work, a visual-spatial memory task that involved nonverbal information, and a semantic access task. In the blueberry group, there was a significant 72% improvement in semantic access and a 13% improvement in visual-spatial memory.

Breast Cancer Prevention

A good deal of research is focused on the cancer prevention potential of Wild Blueberry compounds. Researchers investigating breast cancer include Lynn Adams, Ph.D. and her team at Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, CA, have demonstrated the potential of blueberries to inhibit the growth of Triple Negative Breast Center (TNBC), a particularly aggressive and hard to treat a form of breast cancer.  Blueberries are a rich source of anthocyanins, including many delphinidins, malvidin, petunidin, cyanidin, and peonidin. Blueberries also contain resveratrol, pterostilbene, catechin, epicatechin, kaempferol, quercetin, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, gallic acid, and ursolic acid, all of which have been reported to have anti-cancer properties. Delphinidin, an anthocyanin found in blueberries, has been shown to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in breast cancer cells (EGFR is expressed at high levels in at least 30% of breast cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis). Blueberry extract has been shown to exhibit antitumor activity against triple negative (ER-/PR-/HER2-) breast cancer cells and reduce their metastatic potential. Blueberry was found to inhibit cell proliferation in triple negative cells with no effect on healthy breast cells in one study.

Bone Builder

The iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc and vitamin K in blueberries all contribute to building and maintaining bone structure and strength. Iron and zinc play crucial roles in the maintenance of the strength and elasticity of bones and joints. Low intakes of vitamin K have been associated with a higher risk for bone fracture, while adequate vitamin K intakes improve calcium absorption and may reduce calcium loss.

Outstanding For Mental Health

Population-based studies have shown that consumption of blueberries can lessen the risk of cognitive decline as well as Parkinson Disease – a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from cell death in parts of the brain. Studies have also revealed that in addition to reducing the risk of cognitive damage, blueberries can also improve short-term memory loss and motor coordination.

Repeatedly ranked in the U.S. diet as having one of the highest antioxidant capacities among all fruits, vegetables, spices and seasonings is none other than Blueberries. Blueberries are an excellent source of vitamins C and K, manganese and a good source of dietary fiber.Blueberries are among the fruits highest in antioxidant power, mainly due to their many phytochemicals:

Assists In Weight Loss

Dietary fiber is commonly recognized as an important factor in weight loss and weight management by functioning as a “bulking agent” in the digestive system. High fiber foods increase satiety and reduce appetite making you feel fuller for longer and thereby lowering your overall calorie intake. One cup of blueberries has only 80 calories. Based on a 2,000-calorie diet, you also get 15 percent of your daily value, or DV, of dietary fiber and 30 percent of vitamin C. Other berries are also calorie frugal: A cup of sliced strawberries gives you 50 calories, and the same portion of blackberries and raspberries gives you only 60 calories.

Note: The antioxidant properties of blueberries have been shown to be reduced when eaten with milk, suggesting that the best way to gain maximum benefits from blueberries and other fruits are eaten for their polyphenol content is to consume them either one hour before or two hours after the protein is absorbed.

 

 

 

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